What is Fascia?

Fascia is like a web that surrounds every organ, muscle, nerve, soft-tissue, and cell of the body.
It is connective tissue that extends from head to toe without interruption. Due to it’s whole body connectivity, trauma in one part of the body can produce symptoms in far away structures. MFR treats the whole body, not only looking at symptoms but addressing the cause!  

  • FASCIA SURROUNDS, SUSPENDS, INFUSES, AND PROTECTS EVERY OTHER TISSUE, MUSCLE, BONE, TENDON, LIGAMENT, BLOOD VESSEL AND ORGAN OF THE BODY – ALL THE WAY DOWN TO THE CELLULAR LEVEL. IN HEALTHY CONDITIONS, IT PROVIDES A SUPPORTIVE AND CUSHIONING MECHANISM ALLOWING US TO MOVE SAFELY WITHOUT PAIN OR RESTRICTION.
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We've been erroneously taught to think of ourselves as pieces and parts, individual and separate muscles each performing different actions, but science has now proven that we are a biotensegrity unit, a holistic web of tissues all working together.

Note the fluidity of the fascial fibers.  This is the ground substance of the fascia, and as releases occur, the tissues rehydrate, restoring function and glide to the system.

Note the fluidity of the fascial fibers.  This is the ground substance of the fascia, and as releases occur, the tissues rehydrate, restoring function and glide to the system.

  • FASCIA SURROUNDS, SUSPENDS, INFUSES, AND PROTECTS EVERY OTHER TISSUE, MUSCLE, BONE, TENDON, LIGAMENT, BLOOD VESSEL AND ORGAN OF THE BODY – ALL THE WAY DOWN TO THE CELLULAR LEVEL. IN HEALTHY CONDITIONS, IT PROVIDES A SUPPORTIVE AND CUSHIONING MECHANISM ALLOWING US TO MOVE SAFELY WITHOUT PAIN OR RESTRICTION.
Images of live fascia with restricted areas.  Mid to bottom depicts a release of adhesion happening.  See how the fibers reorganize, shift and change.   

Images of live fascia with restricted areas.  Mid to bottom depicts a release of adhesion happening.  See how the fibers reorganize, shift and change.

 

Fascia is the environment of each of our cells.  We have known that cells need proper nutrition and hydration, but now we understand that they also need proper biomechanical placement to function.  If the fascia is too restricted, the cells die.